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Landscape Photography Tips

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10 Tips for the Aspiring Street Photographer

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Photographing Tots and Toddlers

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How to Photograph a Spider’s Web

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How to Photograph Abandoned Places

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6 Tips for Perfect Composition in Portrait Photography

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How To Use Colour Effectively To Enhance Your Digital Photography

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Photographing People When Traveling

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Framing Your Shots

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How to Photograph Birds?

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How to Take Sharp Images?

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When Blur is Good in Photography?

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How to Photograph People When Traveling?

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White - Color Psychology

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Black - Color Psychology

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What is Infrared Photography?

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What is the meaning of Orange Color?

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What is the meaning of Yellow Color?

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Underwater Photography Tutorial

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Green Color - Impact & Meaning

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Fireworks Photography Tips

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Blue Color - Meaning & Impact

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Digital Photography Tips

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Meaning of Red Color

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How to Shoot Panning Photography?

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CHECK OUT THIS ULTRA-RARE LEICA THREE-LENS ‘TURRET’

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CANON 1D X MARK II VS NIKON D5 HANDS-ON FIELD TEST

It’s the battle of the flagships. The Canon 1D X Mark II squares off against the Nikon D5 in a series of tests including sports shooting and hand-held low-light high ISO street photography. So, which one is better? Or is there even a clear winner?

This hands-on field test was put on by the folks over at TheCameraStoreTV, who did their best to try out both cameras in various situation, point out their strengths and weaknesses, and then decide which of the two is the more practical flagship purchase.

You can see the full comparison up top, but we’ve covered a few of the highlights below.

The 1D X Mark II has fewer AF points overall, but the difference under normal conditions was really tough to notice if there was a difference at all. That all changed in low-light, however, where the Nikon really came into its own and performed “a touch” better than the Canon finding focus at high ISO.

The one place Canon beats Nikon every time is live view autofocus, but that’ll really more for the video shooters.


Speed and Buffer

The 1D X Mark II is the faster camera, shooting 14fps or 16 if you lock the mirror up (compared to 12 and 14fps respectively for the Nikon). Buffer capacity, however, goes to Nikon with 200 RAW shots max compared to 170.

But does it really matter? As far as this comparison is concerned, it’s unlikely anybody will ever reach the end of either buffer.

Dynamic Range

This is where things got interesting. At high ISO, no surprises here, Nikon takes the cake with noticeably cleaner images and more range; however, the roles swapped pretty much everywhere else. Canon’s dynamic range (and image quality overall) seemed to be better at lower ISOs and in normal shooting conditions.

Conclusion

They had a really hard time picking a “winner” but we’ll let them explain that to you. So check out the video up top to watch the whole shootout for yourself and dive into the nitty gritty differences between these two behemoths.


Source: PetaPixel

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BUILD A BETTER PHOTOGRAPHY PORTFOLIO

 

When looking for a job, many photographers question themselves: how many images shall be in my portfolio? How to make a good interesting portfolio? Here are some useful tips for impressing editors and admissions and to make your work look its best.

First of all, let’s take a look at most common mistakes people make when they put together their portfolio.

The most common mistake is including several related images. Photographer should not include multiple images that were clearly shot at the same time and only slightly different. Some photographers also change sizes and formats (vertical/horizontal) of images which is rather a negative indicator of a photographer's ability to evaluate their own work.

Digital photography has brought era of zero-cost images. Photographers shoot too much and all of them find it easier to shoot than edit.  Make sure you work hard on every image and consider every aspect of your work starting from composition and finishing with detailed editing. If you look at the image and have a conversation in your head like: “Well, the composition isn't that bad... I wish I had put more lights, but I guess it looks fine…" Do not put include these images.

Unless every person who sees it goes "WOW," without needing to elaborate, it should not go into your portfolio. Let it go; you will make better images.

Unless it is technically executed at a professional level of mastery, it should not go into your portfolio.

Do not include too many pictures into your portfolio. It shouldn’t be more than 20-30 best of your work. This number of photographs can give rather accurate demonstration of the photographer’s skills. If you include more images, the person won’t be able to remember all of it and might even get bored. However, if you give less images, it won’t be enough for giving the right impression.

Also make sure you update your portfolio. It should not be every day affair. Simply ask yourself the question: "Is everything that's in my book consistent with my style, strong as individual images, and adding to the quality of the body of work as a whole?” Eliminate the weak images without mercy.

One of the most common business mistakes is trying to show the world that you are a competent photographer. That will not help you; it is a given that anyone worthy of being hired to shoot professionally is competent.

What you must excel at communicating with every tweet, image, Facebook post, newsletter, meeting, exhibition, and tear sheet is what makes you unique and different from every other perfectly competent photographer.

You must choose a specialization. Create and show only that work to potential employers and clients. Your challenge is fundamentally to create an image for yourself in the mind of your prospective employers that will stick.

Think of your ideal client. If you don’t have one yet, read our material on this matter. Create a truly iconic body of work in a specific area.

Order in which the images are presented is obviously very important. When selecting the order, keep these tips in mind.

The first image must be a killer. You are announcing yourself and the job of the first image is to make the viewer want to see more.

It might be useful to make mini-sequences of 2-5 images within a 20 image book, like chapters in a larger story. Vary shot size and vantage point, especially if it's a printed book with facing pages. Don't put two wide shots on facing pages. Make the surrounding images strengthen each image by setting up expectations and creating surprise.

Another great trick of all art forms is the law of threes. The way this works is that the first event or image creates a world or expectation, the second image establishes a pattern that the viewer's brain thinks it's now caught onto - and then the 3rd image breaks the pattern and gives the viewer that "wow” feeling of surprise that gives babies - and adults - a little thrill. Try to use images to suggest commentary on surrounding images, even if they had nothing to do with each other originally.

The strong ending is also very important, so NEVER put weak images in the back of the book. Leave the person with the memory of a great image.

The last matter which we would like to mention: print portfolio vs. a digital one?

Most editors say that the print is the final product of photography. Electronic images and the internet are convenient, but to some, they are not beautiful. They are not organic, and you can't touch and hold them. Just make sure that your prints are up to exhibition standards.

Nevertheless, if you are under a deadline, have to get a portfolio out, and don't have time to make prints, don't let stop you - run over with an iPad.

 

Just get it out there.

 

Regards,

DCOP Team

 

 

 

Delhi College of Photography

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